Traditional Approach

If you are not able to acheive periodontal health from non-surgical therapy, or scaling and root planing, surgery may be indicated to treat the areas of your mouth where deep pockets remain. Osseous surgery, also know as "gum surgery" or "pocket elimination" is the conventional way to treat gum disease by eliminating the deep gum pockets around the teeth.

Procedure

Typically, only 1 area of the mouth is treated at a time. During this procedure, Dr. Shah will gently push away the gum tissue to allow complete access under the gum line. He then will removes any remaining disease-causing bacteria and calculus from the root surface. If the bone has been damaged and made irregular by the periodontal disease process, Dr. Shah will smooth out the irregular surfaces before securing the tissue into place. The smoothing of bone will limit areas where disease-causing bacteria can hide and allows the gum tissue to better reattach to healthy bone. Finally, the gum is close either at or below its original postion.

Post-Op

After osseous surgery, Dr. Shah will prescribe antibiotics, analgesic medication, and a special mouth rinse to help during the healing process. Post-operative care instructions will be reviewed both verbally and given to you in writing.  Following the post-operative care instructions is critical for success and for a positive experience. Soreness in the treated area, as well as cold sensitity, are common symptoms that will decrease during healing. A post-operative visit will be needed to check the healing of the area.

Long-Term Benefits

Reducing pocket depth and eliminating existing bacteria are important to prevent damage caused by the progression of periodontal disease and to help you maintain a healthy smile. Deeper pockets are more difficult for you and your dental care professional to clean, so it's important for you to reduce them. Reduced pockets and a combination of daily oral hygiene and professional cleanings every 3-4 months will increase your chances of keeping your natural teeth – and decrease the chance of serious health problems associated with periodontal disease.